Google SVP: Chrome Beats Internet Explorer

In the latest All Things Digital conference (D10), Google’s SVP, Sundar Pichai, confirms that according to their internal web traffic data, Chrome is the number 1 web browser in most countries and gets over 50% market share in many regions.  This means that Chrome has overtaken IE to become the most popular web browser:

Chrome grew roughly 300 percent last year – we have hundreds of millions of active users. We have many ways of looking at it. You can argue about the data, but in general I think we have gained substantial mindshare since we’ve launched the product. I think it’s fair to say that we are number one or number two in all countries in the world. It’s fair to say that roughly a third of people are using Chrome; I think it’s much more than a third in the consumer space. [Emphasis added]

This news basically confirms what Statcounter found earlier this year, that Chrome overtook IE in the web browser market.  Chrome’s market share in the week of 14 May to 20 May, according to Statcounter, was 32.76% while IE had only 31.94%.  This is the first time Chrome overtook IE, according to Statcounter.  Besides, Chrome had already beaten Firefox in 2011.

Statconter - Browser Market Share

Source: TechCrunch

Chrome 14 to add insecure script blocking for security, IE had that already

To fix a potential security loophole that many web sites have, Google will add a new feature, blocking of insecure javascripts, to Chrome 14.  This happens when a HTTPS web site loads javascripts from a HTTP source.  Attackers could intercept the HTTP resource load and take control of the web site if the javasript contains security errors.

Mixed Script in Chrome

Currently if you see the above on the address bar, it is a notification by Chrome telling you that the web site you are viewing has mixed scripts.

Block insecure script info bar

In Chrome 14 we are going to see something different.  When insecure javascript is detected, Chrome would block it automatically and display a notification as an info bar.  You have the options to appreciate Chrome’s thoughtfulness or to accept the script anyway.

For web developers, Chrome 14 logs the problem in Javascript console (Menu -> Tools -> JavaScript Console) like this:

mixed script console in Chrome

Since the first Chrome 14 canary release (14.0.785.0) this insecure script blocking feature has been enabled by default.

According to thechromesource, this feature was first found in Internet Explorer.  Google copying from Microsoft?  Yes.

 

source Google Online Security Blog, via thechromesource

How to integrate Google Plus with Facebook and Twitter

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I like Google+ very much, but until all my friends have migrated to it, I still have to visit Facebook and Twitter frequently.  Could we blend Facebook, Twitter and Google+ into a unified app?  Try these Chrome extensions.

Check Facebook in Google+

Facebook in Google Plus

Image via Crossrider.com

Get this userscript which works in Internet Explorer, Firefox and Chrome.  It adds a button in Google+ which, once you clicked on it, would show your Facebook stream directly.

Show Tweets in Google+

Twitter in Google plus

Image via Crossrider.com

Another userscript by Crossrider.com that combines Twitter and Facebook.  It works in exactly the same way as the Facebook one.

Extend Your Sharing to Facebook and Twitter

Extended Share for Google Plus

I introduced this extension in my post “Google+ Chrome extensions: Surplus, Photo Zoom, Notification Count and more“.  It adds an option under each stream you posted to share it on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn.  The stream would appear in these social networks in the form of a link to your Google+ stream.

 

UPDATE: I found a thread in reddit.com about privacy problems with the Facebook extension.  “This addon acts like malware and the service is a security vulnerability waiting to happen”.  Use your judgment here to determine if you want to install it.  My policy is that unless I can trust the privacy policy of an app, I’d rather not use it.

 

Follow me on Google+  ===> Peter Mugi @ Cloud High Club

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